Scots experts pioneer new carbon capture college in China and energy opportunities in Japan

From left; Gordon Donald of Edinburgh Innovations, Ed Craig from the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation and Simon Kelley from Edinburgh University are pictured outside the Low Carbon College in Shanghai.
From left; Gordon Donald of Edinburgh Innovations, Ed Craig from the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation and Simon Kelley from Edinburgh University are pictured outside the Low Carbon College in Shanghai.

Scottish carbon capture experts have visited China to help launch a low-carbon innovation ‘supply chain’ based on the model of the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation.

ECCI Director Andy Kerr and Deputy Director Ed Craig made a historic visit to Shanghai to support the latest phase in the development of China’s first college for the study of low carbon technology.

The China-UK Low Carbon College (LCC) will encourage climate innovation in China and around the world and draws on the expertise of ECCI, Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Edinburgh University.

The Chinese local government partner, Shanghai Lingang Government, is keen to develop a low carbon innovation ecosystem based on the Edinburgh model and establish Lingang as a regional centre for the testing, implementation and scaling of low carbon solutions and ideas.

The Senior Vice-Principal of Edinburgh University, Charlie Jeffery, and colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, signed the final memorandum of association for the college.

University of Edinburgh staff, working with colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, will help deliver teaching on carbon finance and management, carbon capture and storage and environmental sustainability, while innovative research projects will tackle poor air quality, energy efficiency and sustainable construction. The college will be based at custom-designed facilities in the new ‘smart’ city of Shanghai Lingang.

In 2018, Edinburgh University will be accepting Shanghai Jiao Tong students into five low carbon-focused Masters programmes as well as forging new research partnerships and a tailored executive education programme.

ECCI Deputy Director Ed Craig said: “China produces more than a quarter of the world’s carbon and in one year uses more concrete than the USA did in the whole last century.

“This college will help create, exchange and implement low carbon ideas, technologies and solutions to mitigate the impacts of climate change.

“This groundbreaking project shows the opportunity for the University of Edinburgh and Scotland to make a real impact with our Chinese partners in cultivating talent, industry and technology to lead the transformation to a clean energy future.”

Meanwhile, experts from Edinburgh-based Delta EE – a distributed energy consultancy – will next week take part in a trade mission to Tokyo with the British embassy in Japan.

The mission aims to help energy companies from Scotland and England find opportunities in the newly deregulated Japanese energy market.

Stephen Harkin, principal analyst at Delta EE, explained: “Technologically, Japan is a powerhouse.

“It is already building a leadership position in natural gas alternatives, and anyone trying to sell technology into this market will have a hard time. But what it needs is experience in how flexibility services such as demand response can support the energy market change, or how digital technologies – like the smart grid – work in practice, or how best to engage with customers around energy.”

9 Feb 2018

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